To New Hire or Promote? The Great Divide

Keven Hempel Uncategorized Leave a Comment

It’s that time again!  You are overloaded with work and the daily tasks of running your business are bogging you down. Just when you thought you had it all figured out you look down at your list and say, “Whom am I going to have run this work? When I look at my work force everybody in the company is busy with their own task. How am I going to get this done? I guess I’ll have to hire someone?”

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 Ah ha! Hiring! What fun! You start to think do I really want to write up a job position and post a “now hiring” ad to receive several resumes to sift through maybe get a couple ok candidates for the position, spend endless hours interviewing and maybe find someone able to do the job? No.

 Ah ha! I’ll ask my business professionals, friends, families and Social Media…What? That didn’t work either? Ok. Who can I bring up from within my organization? Oh, no one is prepared to step up because we never trained and prepared for this to happen. Darn, maybe I’ll just hire from outside?

 And the vicious cycle of hiring for your business starts all over again.

Does this sound like the conversation in your head? In the past it has in mine. Now the real question is how do you break the cycle? I believe training and the overused word “innovation”. Lets start with training.

 Over the years I have seen the best fit is the employee that moves up through the ranks in your company. They have spent years getting on the job training working under and/or for you the owner. That’s how you built your company so that is the best the employee to give a promotion to right? Well maybe.

 Before you promote this employee you first should look at what position they hold and who you will have to hire for that new spot, then look at if they have the right tools to handle the new position, after all they may be the best employee and next in line to promote but if there is no one trained in their position to take care of the front line that could give you an even bigger problem.

 Next I would look at if they even want the promotion, some don’t. Some are happy with where they’re at and don’t want the headache of working with the boss. (As much as you think you’re the best person to work with…you may not be.)

 Finally I would consider one of your employees below the “next in line”. What you ask? Hire someone who is below my “next in line employee?” Yes. If you’re really serious about building your company, you should consider all your employees. From the 15-year employee all the way down to the newest one.

After all they all have special skill sets that may benefit your company best at this particular time. You need to:

  1. Assess the position you are hiring for
  2. Interview all in the company that are interested
  3. Promote the one that best fits
  4. Then for everyone else create a clear and well defined career path

Don’t be afraid to let the other employees that didn’t get chosen know they are important to the company and though they didn’t get promoted today they are on a path to see a promotion in the future.

 Next up Innovation

 The business dictionary explains innovation as:

“In business, innovation often results when ideas are applied by the company in order to further satisfy the needs and expectations of the customers.”

 So what does this mean? When you are trying to get your tasks completed you need to look at the tasks and workload themselves. Are they necessary? Do you really need to hire someone? Is there another way to get it done? You see often times the tasks and jobs we have on our list seem important because we have them on the list to do.

So they must be important right? I wouldn’t ever do something that is not very important and try to pass it off to someone else to get it done… right? Wrong again my friends. We do it all the time. We all have things on the task list that we feel are super important to the company and customer when they really are not.

For this I say innovate first before hiring or promoting:

  1. Review your workload often and see if there are ways to cut down the list
  2. Get them done quicker
  3. Create ways to complete them on your own
  4. Then when you have cut it down as much as possible have all your employees review their tasks and workload and see if they can downsize or stream line.

 That may clear up enough time collectively to get it done. If not then you at least know exactly who you have to hire and/or promote, I’m willing to bet when you do this you will see that you were never really ready to hire in the first place. Now that you have reviewed the workload across the board, you are ready to find the new hire or promote the employee you actually need.

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